News/Blog

What does THAT mean?  Good Clinical Practice glossary series: Serious Adverse Events

Our last post in this series on the  62 Good Clinical Practice (GCP) glossary terms described three of the four categories of side effects in a clinical investigation: adverse events (AEs), unanticipated AEs, and adverse device/drug effects.  The last category of side effects in the glossary for us to explain here is the term, serious adverse events, or SAEs.

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Travel tip #2 for clinical operations: What’s in YOUR briefcase?

Not so many years ago, if you posed this question to an experienced Clinical Operations Professional, you may have gotten responses like: lots of Post-It notes! Or: a miniature stapler! In today’s healthcare world, where paper remains a staple, but EMR and global connectivity increasingly digitizes our work, these tools are not enough.  Today’s CRA relies upon both physical and electronic tools to do their

Five myths of risk-based monitoring (RBM)

First, some monitoring basics…
Sponsors of human clinical trials that evaluate new drugs, biologics, and medical devices are responsible for maintaining a high standard of quality and ethics. This means that they must ensure that study participants’ rights, welfare, and safety are protected, and that accurate data are collected, analyzed, and reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FDA requires that sponsors use monitoring

Hart Health Hints: three easy tips for a healthy summer

This is our first entry in the “Hart’s Voyagers” blog series dedicated to the traveling CRA looking for some simple ways to stay on top of their daily health and well-being.

As busy clinical affairs professionals ourselves, we understand how difficult it can be to stay healthy in the fast-paced, demanding world of clinical trial operations. Whether you are a Director of Clinical Affairs, on the road as

Standardizing CRO Costs and Expectations

With the ever-increasing costs associated with conducting clinical trials, many medical device and pharma companies continue outsourcing various operational pieces to contract research organizations (CROs) and other augmentation service groups. By doing so, they are often saving money and the trials are typically completed faster (up to 30%) than when kept in-house (American Pharmaceutical Review ).

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